Author Archives: ACOG News Releases

ACOG Reinvents the Pregnancy Wheel

Today, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) launched a new Estimated Due Date Calculator (EDD Calculator), the first app strictly based on joint recommendations from ACOG, the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) for determining pregnancy due dates.

Ob-gyns Clarify Guidelines for Operative Vaginal Delivery, Note Limitations of Perineal Lacerations as an Obstetric Quality Measure

Washington, DC – As part of an effort to improve obstetric care, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) today released two new documents focusing on operative vaginal delivery and the limitations of perineal lacerations as a measure of obstetric care. Among other objectives, these two documents aim to lower the rate of cesarean delivery in the United States.

ACOG Releases First-Ever Guidance on Pregnancy in Women with Genetic Conditions

Washington, DC — With proper management, women with certain genetic conditions are able to achieve normal pregnancy outcomes, according to a new Committee Opinion from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). This reflects an increased understanding of these rare genetic conditions, as well as new reproductive technologies and improved medical and surgical care.

Ob-gyns Warn Against Marijuana Use for Pregnant Women

Washington, DC — Although roughly half of female marijuana users continue to use during pregnancy, evidence suggests that the drug may have a negative impact on fetal neurodevelopment. This is why in a Committee Opinion issued today, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) is calling for ob-gyns to urge their patients who are pregnant or contemplating pregnancy to discontinue marijuana use.

ACOG Releases New Recommendations on Early Pregnancy Loss

Early pregnancy loss, or miscarriage, is a tragic yet common event, occurring in approximately ten percent of all clinically recognized pregnancies. Because of this, obstetrician-gynecologists must be prepared to care for patients and offer the full range of options for the management of early pregnancy loss, according to new guidelines from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (the College). The recommendations on “Early Pregnancy Loss” are presented in a Practice Bulletin released today by the College.

ACOG Releases a Practical Approach to Improving Outcomes

Providing practice recommendations and evidence-based guidelines in order to help obstetrician-gynecologists improve the health of women is a major part of the mission of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (the College). Unfortunately, adoption and implementation of those recommendations lags behind their publication. A new Committee Opinion from the College addresses the need for greater use of College documents at the institutional and practice levels.

Women’s Health Experts Recommend Obstetric Care Designations to Improve Maternal Care

Washington, DC — Organizations representing women’s healthcare providers today released the first-ever consensus document establishing levels of care for perinatal and postnatal women. “Levels of Maternal Care,” the second in the joint American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) Obstetric Care Consensus Series, proposes a classification system that would promote regionalized care, allowing pregnant women at high risk to receive care in facilities that are prepared to meet their specific needs.

Ob-Gyns Issue Task Force Report on Hypertension in Pregnancy

Washington, DC — The diagnosis of preeclampsia, a leading cause of maternal mortality in the US and worldwide, no longer requires the detection of high levels of protein in the urine (proteinuria), according to the new Task Force Report on Hypertension in Pregnancy by The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (The College). The Task Force recommends that physicians also consider other factors, in addition to elevated blood pressure, to make the diagnosis of preeclampsia.